Posted: Sun 22nd May 2022

“We must support our precious wildlife,” public urged to let grass and wildflowers grow to boost biodiversity

News and Info from Deeside, Flintshire, North Wales
This article is old - Published: Sunday, May 22nd, 2022

“We are in a nature emergency and now, more than ever, we must support our precious wildlife.”

That was the message from Climate Change Minister Julie James on International Day of Biodiversity as she issued a reminder of how small steps, like reducing how often grass is cut, can enhance green spaces.

Biodiversity underpins all robust ecosystems – but it is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history. One in six species assessed in Wales are at risk of extinction.

Changing how often road verges and grasslands are mowed can create more native wildflower-rich meadows, producing healthy biodiversity which is essential to wellbeing.

In Wrexham over 5000 flower bulbs and 200 fruit trees have been planted in a drive to boost local biodiversity.

Wildflowers meadows have been created in Plas Madoc and Caia Park following the launch of a new two year project in March 2020.

Over 1.2 hectares of wildflower meadow has been sown (and harvested) throughout the project areas which provides valuable havens for wildlife, especially bees and butterflies.

This is along with brightening up green spaces in local communities.

In total the project brought together more than 250 volunteers and participants, who helped to plant 5000 bulbs, along with 200 fruit trees creating orchards and 1500 native tree species such as oak, silver birch, ash, hazel, beech, blackthorn and hawthorn planted.

Three hectares of woodland management has also taken place within Caia Park to improve access and open up areas for recreation and play.

This month has also seen gardeners encouraged to take part in “no mow May”, which encourages people to let their grass grow throughout the month.

Speaking on a visit to Golf Road in New Inn, Pontypool, where residents have embraced reduced mowing, Julie James said: “We are in a nature emergency and now, more than ever, we must support our precious wildlife and build more resilience to changes to our environment.

“Regularly mown grass may look tidy, but it has little benefit for nature. By simply changing these practices, we can help create a better habitat for all kinds of animals and insects while storing more carbon in our soils which will help mitigate against climate change.”

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