Posted: Fri 12th Feb 2021

Plan in place to tackle fungal disease affecting one of Flintshire’s most common trees

News and Info from Deeside, Flintshire, North Wales
This article is old - Published: Friday, Feb 12th, 2021


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A plan is in place from Flintshire County Council to tackle a disease affecting one of the county’s most common trees.

Ash dieback, which originated in Asia and was first identified in the UK back in 2012, affects ash trees across the country which could result in public safety issues via falling branches.

There is currently no solution to prevent the spread of the disease which the Council says has implications for both themselves and landowners where the trees are situated.

They estimate there are over 12,000 ash trees which are more than 5m tall growing adjacent to the county’s main roads and is the most deadly disease affecting trees since Dutch elm disease.

Tree teams will move along the A5151 from Lloc to Trelawnydd and then move onto the A541 through the Hendre area starting next week.

Flintshire County Council’s Cabinet Member for Streetscene and Countryside, Councillor Carolyn Thomas, said: “We have a plan for which areas to target first. It’s important to look at trees close to main roads and public areas and this is the main focus of our initial work.

“We want to raise awareness among landowners that they must make themselves aware of the disease and its effects and ensure that they deal with any potential hazards.”

Flintshire County Council Tree Inspector, Dewi Ellis, added: “These trees, if left, will cause problems and although it may seem drastic, there’s no alternative and it is best to remove the trees safely.

“Flintshire County Council does not want to leave them to come down by themselves which could be extremely dangerous.”

Ash dieback was first confirmed to have been affecting ash trees in Flintshire on the A55 at Northop by Forestry Commission plant health staff in 2015.

In 2016, it was found in a woodland near Rhydymwyn on ash that had been cut down underneath overhead power cables.

The trees cover around 1500 hectares of the county’s 2700 hectares of broadleaved woodland.

For more information, including the Council’s Ash Dieback Action Plan guidance for landowners, managing trees for safety, and protecting wildlife, can be found on the Council’s website

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