Posted: Thu 7th Apr 2022

Flintshire police call on parents to speak to their kids about anti-social behaviour

News and Info from Deeside, Flintshire, North Wales
This article is old - Published: Thursday, Apr 7th, 2022

Police in Flintshire have called on parents to speak to their children about the difference between acceptable behaviour and anti-social behaviour (ASB).

The call comes ahead of the school holidays when anti-social behaviour incidents increase.

In a letter sent to schools, Flintshire South Neighbourhood Police Team Sargeant, Kerry Nash said:

“We are always looking for new ways to reach out to the community and as part of a new joint working initiative we are linking in with local High Schools in order to reach out to parents and carers.”

“The focus of this message is around anti-social behaviour (ASB) as the Easter Holidays are now upon us.”

“As a team we are keen to prevent the increase in anti-social behaviour which is traditionally seen during the school holiday period.”

Sgt Nash said: “Over the past few months there has been increased focus on ASB in certain areas of Flintshire South; where there was a particular problem and in Buckley this culminated in a dispersal order, as a community policing team preventing your children from being out together is the last thing we want to do.”

“We would therefore like to request that you support us in preventing this sort of behaviour.”

“As children I’m sure the vast majority have played games such as “knock door run” etc. however times have moved on and if these sorts of incidents are reported to North Wales Police then they now are categorised as ASB and would have to be dealt with by an Officer or a PCSO.”

Yellow card

Sgt Nash explained about the Yellow card system used by police, she said:

“As a parent you may not be aware that we operate a Yellow card system where incidents such as these would culminate in a yellow card being issued and a referral being put in to the Youth Justice Service.”

“A yellow card is utilised for incidents where there is no criminal offence but where there is evidence of ASB so would fit the above example of “knock door run”.”

“Where there is evidence of criminal offences being committed then these matters would need to be dealt with more formally and could, in the worst case scenario, result in an interview under caution or even arrest.”

Sgt Nash said: “A good example of this is the recent Tik Tok craze where children have been encouraged to kick doors in order to leave a footprint on the door – this would be classed as criminal damage and due to the increase in CCTV and Ring doorbell footage often there is irrefutable evidence.”

“We are keen to avoid criminalising children for having a bit of fun and therefore are asking you, as parents, to have a discussion with your children about the difference between acceptable behaviour and ASB.”

 

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