Posted: Mon 17th Jun 2019

New signs warning drivers to be aware of wildlife set to appear on UK roads

News and Info from Deeside, Flintshire, North Wales
This article is old - Published: Monday, Jun 17th, 2019


Campaign Advert

Hundreds of people are injured every year in collisions involving animals in the road, according to the latest Department for Transport figures.

In 2017, 629 people were injured in accidents involving an animal in the road (excluding horses) and 4 people were killed.

UK Government has unveiled a new traffic sign today, featuring a hedgehog, which warns road users of hazards due to animals in the road ahead and could be placed in areas where accident rates are highest.

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling is calling on local authorities and animal welfare groups to identify accident and wildlife hotspots where the sign should be located.

The road sign is also designed to reverse the decline in wildlife numbers, in particular, hedgehogs whose population in rural areas has halved since 2000.

Chris Grayling said:

“We have some of the safest roads in the world but we are always looking at how we can make them safer. Motorcyclists and other vulnerable road users are particularly at risk.

The new small mammal warning sign should help to reduce the number of people killed and injured, as well as helping our precious small wild mammal population to flourish.”

Grayling is also meeting with road safety experts today, including Brake, the AA and the RAC, together with animal protection groups including the Wildlife Trust, to discuss the scale of the problem.

Between 2005 and 2017, 100 people were killed, with a further 14,173 injured in accidents where an animal was in the road.

Tony Campbell, chief executive of the Motorcycle Industry Association(MCIA), said:

“Powered two-wheelers provide a great solution to road congestion, but like all road users, riders must be aware of those around them.

Therefore the MCIA is pleased to welcome these new signs that will help everyone, including those on 2 wheels or 4 legs, complete their journeys more safely.”

The small wildlife sign complements other warning signs already used on UK roads, filling a gap between warnings about smaller animals such as migratory toads and wildfowl, and large animals such as deer and livestock.

Jill Nelson, CEO at People’s Trust for Endangered Species, said:

“At PTES roadkill has long been a concern, which is why we launched our Mammals on Roads survey.

We have also joined forces with the British Hedgehog Preservation Society to deliver the Hedgehog Street campaign, meeting with Mr Grayling to express our concerns for hedgehogs on roads and elsewhere.

We welcome this focus on road safety and protection for all small mammals.”

The signs will be used to warn motorists in areas where there are large concentrations of small wild animals, including squirrels, badgers, otters and hedgehogs.

 

Spotted something? Got a story? Send a Facebook Message | A direct message on Twitter | Email: [email protected]
Latest News

  • Clean energy firm proposes groundbreaking Deeside nuclear park to produce ‘ruby’ hydrogen
  • UK Parliament dissolves ahead of July general election
  • Wales Audit Office Chair resigns over conflict of interest

  • More...

    Clean energy firm proposes groundbreaking Deeside nuclear park to produce ‘ruby’ hydrogen

    News

    UK Parliament dissolves ahead of July general election

    News

    Wales Audit Office Chair resigns over conflict of interest

    News

    Deeside based Locit bolsters sales team amid ‘phenomenal’ growth

    News

    Fundraisers raise almost £8,000 for Countess Charity in Chester Half Marathon

    News

    Deeside based POP UP Products helps footballer Jamie raise funds for cancer charity

    News

    Vaughan Gething risked health of North Wales patients for political gain, says Plaid Cymru

    News

    Health boards across Wales urged to release ambulances from A&E faster to improve response times

    News

    Golden milestone for top accountant who’s still working after breaking his back twice

    News