Posted: Sun 22nd May 2016

Amazing video’s show how Ewloe & Flint Castles would have looked in the 13th Century

News and Info from Deeside, Flintshire, North Wales
This article is old - Published: Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

Two amazing videos have been created showcasing Flintshire’s Ewloe and Flint castles as they may have looked when they were occupied and in use in the 13th Century.

The video’s of the 3D digital reconstruction were created by Martin Moss and posted on his YouTube channel.

Martin uses the latest graphics software and tools to digitally rebuild the castles to their former glory.

His work also shows how things may have looked inside when the castles were fully occupied.

Ewloe Castle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqXSALJjouU

Built around 1257, Ewloe castle is a relic of a brief triumph that Welsh prince Llywelyn ap Gruffudd had over the English Crown in the mid 13th century.

A fortification had existed on or near the site since the Battle of Ewloe in 1157.

The castle, was one of the last fortifications to be built by the sovereign Princes of Wales, was abandoned at the beginning of the invasion of Wales by Edward I in 1277.

Locally quarried sandstone was used in the castles construction however, historians say the castle may never have actually been completed.

On taking the castle, the English Crown gave it little military value and allowed it to fall into ruin.

Flint Castle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJEoMdRgmpk

Flint Castle was the first of a series of castles built during King Edward I’s campaign to conquer Wales.

The site was chosen for its strategic position in North East Wales only one day’s march from Chester, supplies could be brought along the River Dee and there was by a ford across to England that could be used at low tide.

Building work began in 1277 under Richard L’Engenour, who would later become Mayor of Chester in 1304.

The castle and its earthworks were built by 1,800 laborers and masons using local Millstone Grit ashlar and sandstone.

In November 1280, the Savoyard master mason James of Saint George began overseeing construction at Flint for Edward I.He remained at the castle for 17 months.

James of Saint George then moved onto Rhuddlan to oversee its completion.

When work ceased in 1286, Flint Castle had an inner ward and an outer bailey. They were separated by a tidal moat and were connected with gatehouse and drawbridge.

During the English Civil War, Flint Castle was held by the Royalists. It was finally captured by the Parliamentarians in 1647 after a three-month siege.

In accordance with Cromwell’s destruction order the castle was destroyed to prevent further use, the ruins are what remain today.

By the 19th century part of the site’s outer bailey was used as Flintshire’s County Jail.

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